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June 18, 2019

9 am - 3 pm

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St. Catharines Hospital Auditorium 

proudly

PRESENTED BY:

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Registration Deadline: June 14

JOIN US!

On June 18 join your colleagues all over Canada for our 2019 Injury Prevention Day with a focus on Bariatric Patient Care. Learn from a great line-up of industry experts how you can best prevent an injury on the job, and discover the many bariatric supports available. Engage with top manufacturers of bariatric equipment at the expo and network over a complimentary lunch.

Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists, Nurses and other Healthcare professionals are all invited to attend this exciting inaugural event. 

timeline 

 

9:00 am - 9:30 am Opening Remarks, OTN begins @ 9 am

9:30 am - 10:15 am Elisa Galle OT Reg. (ONT.), MSC (OT)

- 15 Minute Break -

10:30 am - 11:15 am Tammy DeMol-O’Sullivan RN IIWCC & Roxie Demers BScN RN IIWCC-Can

- Lunch + Raffle Draw -

1:15 pm - 2:00 pm Sandra Elia

- 15 Minute Break -

2:15 pm - 3:00 pm Dr. Michael Holmes

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Closing Remarks, OTN ends @ 4 pm

- LIVE STREAM AVAILABLE -

You do not need to register to attend the live feed.

live feed details

OTN event ID#: 121207236

Webcast link: http://webcast.otn.ca/mywebcast?id=121207236

The live feed will begin at 9 am, participants can begin logging on at 8:45 am.

As advised by OTN “Please ensure you test your internet browser and Microsoft Silverlight BEFORE your webcast event”. These links can be found on the left-hand side of the main page of OTN's Webcasting Centre.

Topic: Can Food Be Addictive?


Bio: Sandra is one of the world’s first Certified Food Addiction Counselors, certified under the European Certification Board | Prevention & Addictions Counselling. She runs Ontario’s only outpatient Food Addiction Recovery Program out of The Wharton Medical Clinic. Sandra co-created Canada’s first 28-day residential treatment program. Sandra runs retreats that enable clients to reclaim their health and lives. Her programs yield tremendous success: clients report weight loss, reductions in medication and, most importantly, finding neutrality with food. Sandra is the Vice Chair for the Obesity Canada (Toronto Chapter). Obesity Canada was founded by Dr. Arya Sharma with the mission to be Canada’s authoritative voice on evidence-based approaches for obesity prevention, treatment, and policy. Presentation Abstract: Can food be addictive? Obesity is not simply about bodyweight or body image. It’s about human vulnerability. Behind every obesity statistic is a real person living with physical, mental, and emotional challenges. Sandra Elia knows this firsthand. She has lived two lives: one as a morbidly obese woman for 15 years. She experienced a world that was not made for her size, seeking assistance from biased healthcare providers, and dealing with fat-shaming. Since those difficult days, Sandra has transformed her life and her body, losing over 100 pounds and keeping the weight off for 15 years. Sandra is a Health Care Provider to those living with obesity and/or self-identify as a Food Addict. Obesity affects cognitive control, sensory cue processing, and reward processing centres of the brain. Functional MRIs have proven that people living with obesity experience food cues more intensely, lighting up the reward centre more dramatically than someone with a healthy body size. If this weren’t enough of a disadvantage, this population can’t get much satisfaction from eating either! Food satisfaction is dampened when eating. The natural human desire to “hunt” for food can be hijacked by obesity. How do we stop the “hunt” and address the mesolimbic system (regulates the "wanting" or "desire" attribute given by the brain, motivation, reinforcement learning) and leptin (a cell-signalling hormone vital in the regulation of appetite, food intake and body weigh) resistance and relative deficiency in this population? ‘Hunger vs. Hedonically’ driven Eating - “Eating and the desire to eat need to be understood as separate activities involving separate mechanisms in the brain. Their distinct roles help us understand another brain chemical: dopamine.” – Dr. David Kessler. Can ultra-processed foods overwhelm our brain’s reward system? The reward system, a primitive part of the brain, exists to ensure we seek what we need, and it alerts us to the sights, sounds, and scents that point us there. It operates in the realm of instinct and reflex, this system can trip us up in a world with 24/7 opportunities to fulfill our desires. Obesity is a complex and chronic condition, there are many factors at play that are not within the individual’s control (e.g., epigenetic, biological, psychosocial, environmental). There isn’t one answer. Helping patients create a “village” of support with many interventions can help tremendously, this support can include:

  • Food Addiction Counselling
  • Good sleep hygiene
  • Finding new ways to measure success – that don’t include monitoring weight
  • Adopting a sustainable meal-plan
  • Pharmacological therapy
  • Mindfulness and spirituality
  • Sustainable / enjoyable exercise
  • Community Support





Elisa Galle OT Reg. (Ont.), MSc (OT) @ 9:30 am

Tammy DeMol-O’Sullivan RN IIWCC & Roxie Demers BScN RN IIWCC-Can @ 10:30 am

Topic: Can Food Be Addictive?


Bio: Sandra is one of the world’s first Certified Food Addiction Counselors, certified under the European Certification Board | Prevention & Addictions Counselling. She runs Ontario’s only outpatient Food Addiction Recovery Program out of The Wharton Medical Clinic. Sandra co-created Canada’s first 28-day residential treatment program. Sandra runs retreats that enable clients to reclaim their health and lives. Her programs yield tremendous success: clients report weight loss, reductions in medication and, most importantly, finding neutrality with food. Sandra is the Vice Chair for the Obesity Canada (Toronto Chapter). Obesity Canada was founded by Dr. Arya Sharma with the mission to be Canada’s authoritative voice on evidence-based approaches for obesity prevention, treatment, and policy. Presentation Abstract: Can food be addictive? Obesity is not simply about bodyweight or body image. It’s about human vulnerability. Behind every obesity statistic is a real person living with physical, mental, and emotional challenges. Sandra Elia knows this firsthand. She has lived two lives: one as a morbidly obese woman for 15 years. She experienced a world that was not made for her size, seeking assistance from biased healthcare providers, and dealing with fat-shaming. Since those difficult days, Sandra has transformed her life and her body, losing over 100 pounds and keeping the weight off for 15 years. Sandra is a Health Care Provider to those living with obesity and/or self-identify as a Food Addict. Obesity affects cognitive control, sensory cue processing, and reward processing centres of the brain. Functional MRIs have proven that people living with obesity experience food cues more intensely, lighting up the reward centre more dramatically than someone with a healthy body size. If this weren’t enough of a disadvantage, this population can’t get much satisfaction from eating either! Food satisfaction is dampened when eating. The natural human desire to “hunt” for food can be hijacked by obesity. How do we stop the “hunt” and address the mesolimbic system (regulates the "wanting" or "desire" attribute given by the brain, motivation, reinforcement learning) and leptin (a cell-signalling hormone vital in the regulation of appetite, food intake and body weigh) resistance and relative deficiency in this population? ‘Hunger vs. Hedonically’ driven Eating - “Eating and the desire to eat need to be understood as separate activities involving separate mechanisms in the brain. Their distinct roles help us understand another brain chemical: dopamine.” – Dr. David Kessler. Can ultra-processed foods overwhelm our brain’s reward system? The reward system, a primitive part of the brain, exists to ensure we seek what we need, and it alerts us to the sights, sounds, and scents that point us there. It operates in the realm of instinct and reflex, this system can trip us up in a world with 24/7 opportunities to fulfill our desires. Obesity is a complex and chronic condition, there are many factors at play that are not within the individual’s control (e.g., epigenetic, biological, psychosocial, environmental). There isn’t one answer. Helping patients create a “village” of support with many interventions can help tremendously, this support can include:

  • Food Addiction Counselling
  • Good sleep hygiene
  • Finding new ways to measure success – that don’t include monitoring weight
  • Adopting a sustainable meal-plan
  • Pharmacological therapy
  • Mindfulness and spirituality
  • Sustainable / enjoyable exercise
  • Community Support





Topic: Can Food Be Addictive?


Bio: Sandra is one of the world’s first Certified Food Addiction Counselors, certified under the European Certification Board | Prevention & Addictions Counselling. She runs Ontario’s only outpatient Food Addiction Recovery Program out of The Wharton Medical Clinic. Sandra co-created Canada’s first 28-day residential treatment program. Sandra runs retreats that enable clients to reclaim their health and lives. Her programs yield tremendous success: clients report weight loss, reductions in medication and, most importantly, finding neutrality with food. Sandra is the Vice Chair for the Obesity Canada (Toronto Chapter). Obesity Canada was founded by Dr. Arya Sharma with the mission to be Canada’s authoritative voice on evidence-based approaches for obesity prevention, treatment, and policy. Presentation Abstract: Can food be addictive? Obesity is not simply about bodyweight or body image. It’s about human vulnerability. Behind every obesity statistic is a real person living with physical, mental, and emotional challenges. Sandra Elia knows this firsthand. She has lived two lives: one as a morbidly obese woman for 15 years. She experienced a world that was not made for her size, seeking assistance from biased healthcare providers, and dealing with fat-shaming. Since those difficult days, Sandra has transformed her life and her body, losing over 100 pounds and keeping the weight off for 15 years. Sandra is a Health Care Provider to those living with obesity and/or self-identify as a Food Addict. Obesity affects cognitive control, sensory cue processing, and reward processing centres of the brain. Functional MRIs have proven that people living with obesity experience food cues more intensely, lighting up the reward centre more dramatically than someone with a healthy body size. If this weren’t enough of a disadvantage, this population can’t get much satisfaction from eating either! Food satisfaction is dampened when eating. The natural human desire to “hunt” for food can be hijacked by obesity. How do we stop the “hunt” and address the mesolimbic system (regulates the "wanting" or "desire" attribute given by the brain, motivation, reinforcement learning) and leptin (a cell-signalling hormone vital in the regulation of appetite, food intake and body weigh) resistance and relative deficiency in this population? ‘Hunger vs. Hedonically’ driven Eating - “Eating and the desire to eat need to be understood as separate activities involving separate mechanisms in the brain. Their distinct roles help us understand another brain chemical: dopamine.” – Dr. David Kessler. Can ultra-processed foods overwhelm our brain’s reward system? The reward system, a primitive part of the brain, exists to ensure we seek what we need, and it alerts us to the sights, sounds, and scents that point us there. It operates in the realm of instinct and reflex, this system can trip us up in a world with 24/7 opportunities to fulfill our desires. Obesity is a complex and chronic condition, there are many factors at play that are not within the individual’s control (e.g., epigenetic, biological, psychosocial, environmental). There isn’t one answer. Helping patients create a “village” of support with many interventions can help tremendously, this support can include:

  • Food Addiction Counselling
  • Good sleep hygiene
  • Finding new ways to measure success – that don’t include monitoring weight
  • Adopting a sustainable meal-plan
  • Pharmacological therapy
  • Mindfulness and spirituality
  • Sustainable / enjoyable exercise
  • Community Support





sandra elia @ 1:15 pm

dr. Michael holmes @ 2:15 pm

Topic: Can Food Be Addictive?


Bio: Sandra is one of the world’s first Certified Food Addiction Counselors, certified under the European Certification Board | Prevention & Addictions Counselling. She runs Ontario’s only outpatient Food Addiction Recovery Program out of The Wharton Medical Clinic. Sandra co-created Canada’s first 28-day residential treatment program. Sandra runs retreats that enable clients to reclaim their health and lives. Her programs yield tremendous success: clients report weight loss, reductions in medication and, most importantly, finding neutrality with food. Sandra is the Vice Chair for the Obesity Canada (Toronto Chapter). Obesity Canada was founded by Dr. Arya Sharma with the mission to be Canada’s authoritative voice on evidence-based approaches for obesity prevention, treatment, and policy. Presentation Abstract: Can food be addictive? Obesity is not simply about bodyweight or body image. It’s about human vulnerability. Behind every obesity statistic is a real person living with physical, mental, and emotional challenges. Sandra Elia knows this firsthand. She has lived two lives: one as a morbidly obese woman for 15 years. She experienced a world that was not made for her size, seeking assistance from biased healthcare providers, and dealing with fat-shaming. Since those difficult days, Sandra has transformed her life and her body, losing over 100 pounds and keeping the weight off for 15 years. Sandra is a Health Care Provider to those living with obesity and/or self-identify as a Food Addict. Obesity affects cognitive control, sensory cue processing, and reward processing centres of the brain. Functional MRIs have proven that people living with obesity experience food cues more intensely, lighting up the reward centre more dramatically than someone with a healthy body size. If this weren’t enough of a disadvantage, this population can’t get much satisfaction from eating either! Food satisfaction is dampened when eating. The natural human desire to “hunt” for food can be hijacked by obesity. How do we stop the “hunt” and address the mesolimbic system (regulates the "wanting" or "desire" attribute given by the brain, motivation, reinforcement learning) and leptin (a cell-signalling hormone vital in the regulation of appetite, food intake and body weigh) resistance and relative deficiency in this population? ‘Hunger vs. Hedonically’ driven Eating - “Eating and the desire to eat need to be understood as separate activities involving separate mechanisms in the brain. Their distinct roles help us understand another brain chemical: dopamine.” – Dr. David Kessler. Can ultra-processed foods overwhelm our brain’s reward system? The reward system, a primitive part of the brain, exists to ensure we seek what we need, and it alerts us to the sights, sounds, and scents that point us there. It operates in the realm of instinct and reflex, this system can trip us up in a world with 24/7 opportunities to fulfill our desires. Obesity is a complex and chronic condition, there are many factors at play that are not within the individual’s control (e.g., epigenetic, biological, psychosocial, environmental). There isn’t one answer. Helping patients create a “village” of support with many interventions can help tremendously, this support can include:

  • Food Addiction Counselling
  • Good sleep hygiene
  • Finding new ways to measure success – that don’t include monitoring weight
  • Adopting a sustainable meal-plan
  • Pharmacological therapy
  • Mindfulness and spirituality
  • Sustainable / enjoyable exercise
  • Community Support





guest speakers & topics

nh st. catharines site:

1200 Fourth Ave.

St. Catharines, ON L2S 0A9

Event will take place in the Auditorium. 

Parking:

Visitor/Patient parking lots A & B are available. Both lots are labelled. From the 406. Take Fourth Avenue exit and continue right onto Fourth Avenue.  Turn left off of Fourth Avenue onto First Street Louth. The first set of lights will be a right hand turn and the main entrance to the hospital parking.

Directions to Auditorium:

From either lot, head to the main entrance of the hospital. Once inside the doors walk straight, continue past Tim Horton’s. There will be a stairwell on the left that reads ‘1 million square feet of care’. Take that stairwell and the vendor presentation area will be right there; Auditorium behind. For elevators, continue straight past the stairs to the main set of three of elevators. Continue to floor #2. When on floor #2 continue straight to the first set of doors on the right hand side; Auditorium straight ahead.

our sponsors:

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